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A Joyful Messenger
Member
Posts: 296

How would you describe someone withPost tramitic stress disorder {PTSD}? How do you know if someone is affected by it? What are the  signs and symptoms?

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**JOYFUL MESSENGER

July 18, 2013 at 9:30 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Ruth Currah
Site Owner
Posts: 567

When we are abused over time we learn self protection habits. We become super aware of approaching dangers and we brace for them. We may get into habits of fighting back, even before the new event has happened. This is survival techniques that are needed. Well, PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) is when we react such without a new event happening, anything that reminds us of the past abuse will trigger survival reactions that are not needed, but make the safe present feel unsafe, and instead of making the future safe makes it a turmoil of emotions and reactions that often not only hurt us but can hurt others. We may strike out making them defensive when they were not threatening you. And if you do this enough they will get PTSD in relation to you. Then you have two people going through threatening behaviors toward eat other and all real communication is shut down and the situation gets bad. It may be what has happened in your family when you described them as always fighting when they are together.

 

 

PTSD also can occur instantaneously if the stressful event is severe enough, such as feelings of dying or experiencing others death. The habits of anxiety, apprehension, and reactions can take hold instantly and hang on for a long, long, long time.

July 18, 2013 at 6:44 PM Flag Quote & Reply

A Joyful Messenger
Member
Posts: 296

Okay you described PTSD but you did not answer the other two questions. How can I know when someone I am talking to has ptsd and how do I recognize  the signs and symptoms?

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**JOYFUL MESSENGER

July 23, 2013 at 11:09 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Ruth Currah
Site Owner
Posts: 567

In general you do not know they have PTSD unless they display the signs above. When you want to talk about a subject they may fight you, they may begin to look nervous and fidgety, or they will relate the horrors of the situation and their reply shows a bigger and scarier feeling then the average person displays. They may tell you, such as a soldier saying they end up in the hospital every fourth of July because the explosions remind them of incoming bombs in war. You can tell if you yourself also have PTSD by the same symptoms. You may fight someone who is getting close to talking about your past PTSD. Your family may fight with each other for that reason. They each remind each other of the traumatic events they went through in the family together, just by being together. They are trying to shut each other up by controlling eachother and in so doing they activate each other, and then the cycle escalates.

 

I use to get clients that came in to get officially diagnosed with PTSD because their employers or others were not sure if they did or did not have it, they did not want to compensate for the person's PTSD unless they had to, or it was needed for a third party such as an insurance company or the other person's lawyers. At those times I would go over the traumatic event and see how they physically, emotionally, and intellectually responded. I would look at how believable or evident the symptoms were. I also had to assess whether or not they were telling the truth or were delusional. It is not always an easy task.

July 23, 2013 at 2:23 PM Flag Quote & Reply

A Joyful Messenger
Member
Posts: 296

Okay...if you diagnose some one with ptsd...how do you treat it? How do you help the person overcome thier trouble?

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**JOYFUL MESSENGER

July 30, 2013 at 1:19 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Ruth Currah
Site Owner
Posts: 567

 

You help them see that the event is no longer a danger, that their reactions are normal but will go away if they do not keep feeding them. If someone reacts to safe conditions with the same fear and reactions as the traumatic event, they will keep the reactions alive for years if not for a life time. So they have to react differently. When they go through similar circumstances and react differently and the body experiences the fact that it is no longer dangerous then the body readjusts and drops the old feelings. It can take awhile and take several new runs with the same type of situations to condition the body, but it will work. 

 

Agoraphobia, fear of leaving the house, can result  when people who have panic attacks believe certain situations will always cause panics. They talk themselves into it. They usually are people who tend to be very suggestible and are hypnotized easily. They are not skeptics of their own reactions, so to speak. Courage is not lack of fear but the act of doing what needs to be done even if they are scared.

 

I use to fear elevators. Someone told me they have breaks and can not fall more then one story. So I began to ride them even though the fear was still there. The fear went away in time. Do you relate to that?


July 30, 2013 at 10:49 PM Flag Quote & Reply

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